Users

Public Awareness

Safeguarding the Public Through Awareness and Education

Crucial to the safe operation of our system is the public's awareness of the existence of our pipeline, and what can be done to safeguard everyone. Iroquois' Public Awareness Program provides residents and businesses, local public officials, and emergency responders with important pipeline safety information.

To view or download, click on the appropriate link below.

Supplemental information is also provided in our Iroquois Report, Safety Issue.

To view or download a copy of our latest safety issue, click below.

Pipeline Purpose, Reliability and Location

The Iroquois system operates 416 miles of pipeline that delivers clean natural gas to commercial and industrial users, as well as to local distribution companies for residential use. Natural gas is the most popular home heating fuel in America, and pipelines are among the safest and most secure methods of transporting energy.

The benefits provided by our pipeline -- including market access, increased competition and greater energy diversity, and improved air quality -- are possible because our pipeline transports natural gas reliably and safely. Advanced technology and comprehensive monitoring and maintenance programs ensure the integrity of the pipeline, and enable us to provide the reliable service that helps keep our customers competitive.

Since our transmission pipeline is buried underground, 4-foot tall white line markers with blue writing and trim identify its approximate location. These markers, which are mostly located at road crossings, display our name as well as our Emergency Contact Number. Markers only indicate the general location of a pipeline and cannot be relied upon to indicate the exact position.

Pig Launcher

Pipeline Hazard Awareness and Prevention

In the United States, natural gas transmission pipelines have the best safety record of any type of long-distance transportation system in the country. Natural gas is clean, convenient and efficient, which makes it today's energy of choice.

Like all forms of energy, natural gas must be handled properly. Despite an excellent safety record, a gas leak caused by damage to a pipeline may pose a hazard and has the potential to ignite. Iroquois works diligently to ensure the safety of our pipeline through a variety of measures, including:

  • Participation in one-call and dig safe programs
  • Inspection programs
  • Design and construction practices
  • Workforce qualifications
  • Public education programs
  • Industry safety practices and government oversight
  • Pipeline markers and facility mapping
  • Leak surveys
  • Patrol of facilities
  • Pressure monitoring
  • Odorization
  • Communication and coordination with city and municipal agencies
  • Security measures
  • Pipeline integrity management programs

Leak Recognition and Response

Knowledge and awareness are essential for natural gas safety. A gas leak is usually recognized by smell, sight or sound:

Smell.

Natural gas is colorless and odorless. Typically a distinct and recognizable odorant (known as mercaptan) is added for quick detection and recognition.

Sight.

A dust cloud, mist, fog, bubbles in standing water, or vegetation that appears to be dead or dying for no apparent reason.

Sound.

An unusual noise like roaring, hissing, or whistling.

If you suspect a leak:

  • MOVE to a safe location.
  • CALL local emergency responders at 911 and Iroquois Gas Control at 800-888-3982.
  • DO NOT strike a match, use telephones, operate engines and motors, switch lights or appliances on or off, or even turn on a flashlight in the area where you smell gas. These items can produce sparks that might ignite the gas and cause an explosion.

For Emergency Personnel:

  • SECURE the site and take steps to eliminate ignition sources.
  • EVACUATE the general public from the vicinity of the leak.
  • CONTROL secondary fires.
  • DO NOT try to extinguish a gas burning fire unless there is a threat to life.
  • CONTACT Iroquois at 800-888-3982.

For Excavators:

  • STOP work, shut down all equipment, and evacuate to a safe distance.
  • CALL 911 if there is blowing gas.
  • CALL Iroquois at 800-888-3982.
  • DO NOT strike a match, use telephones, operate engines and motors, switch lights or appliances on or off, or even turn on a flashlight in the area where you smell gas. These items can produce sparks that might ignite the gas and cause an explosion.
  • ALERT everyone on the premises.
  • KEEP the public and traffic away.
  • DO NOT try to fix the pipe or slow the rate of leaking gas.
  • NOTIFY Iroquois immediately at 800-888-3982 if you suspect or become aware of a dent, scratch, or coating damage to the pipeline.
Person Using Computer

NPMS (National Pipeline Mapping System)

For additional information on transmission pipelines and pipeline operators in your area, as well as other details important to natural gas safety, contact the National Pipeline Mapping System. The mapping system is called the Pipeline Integrity Management Mapping System. Federal, state and local government officials and pipeline operators are provided detailed access. For access you must request a username and password from the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.